Financial Myth Busting with Dawn J. Bennett: Dick Sim, Global Entrepreneur

Dawn J. Bennett, host of Financial Myth Busting, recently interviewed Dim Sim a global entrepreneur and author, on her show. In his interview with Bennett, Sim discusses the coming clash we’re going to have between the United States, the European Union, the Middle East and Africa, as well as the geopolitical changes that these disparities are fueling.

Bennett says America is fighting for its existence on an economic, cultural and physical front. On the economic front, Bennett says she thinks the government has to get out of the way. Sim says he thinks the government is part of the problem, especially for certain segments of society.

“Lately, in the last decade or so, economic growth has been weak and there’s large segments of our society, the bulk of them working people, who are really suffering,” says Sim. “We still have a bunch of people that do really well: the big business people, the big politicians, the think tanks, those people that are surrounded and interact with them they are doing very well. So we have a sort of fragmented society and that’s part of what we saw with the Trump force. So we’re sinking the bottom of our society, economically, but that’s connected to cultural issues.”

At the same time, there’s the mass migration out of the Middle East, which presents a moral quandary. As Bennett describes it, “You don’t want to drown your country with refugees who don’t fit in and don’t contribute but you also don’t want to sit there as thousands of migrants drown while trying to escape oppression by fleeing across the Mediterranean.”

Sim says we have a moral obligation to help these people who are suffering around the world, but we need to be selective about who we bring over here.  He explains the biggest contribution is all the technology that’s been industrialized since the Second World War came out of the United Sates, and this has immense implications in terms of wealth in the United States but also throughout the world in terms of relieving global poverty and suffering. He says we need to continue performing this high-value technical work and need immigration policies that support that.

“We can’t help everyone and we need to keep doing what we do because the world needs what the U.S. does in terms of inventing new technology in agriculture, computers, software, medical technology,” Sim says. “And we have a particular way our society is organized structurally but also culturally that does that. We don’t often talk about that and we don’t teach it to our children. It’s a very precious reality that we need to care more about and protect more.”

Right now the United States’ chief concern is terrorists coming in, but that’s not really the big issue, according to Sim.

“The big issue is the evidence in Europe is that Muslims—not all Muslims but a lot of those who come to Europe—they do not assimilate, they set up communities that are self-segregated and they continue to live by the values of conservative Islam,” Sim explains. “And these values, in terms of the treatment of women, gays—you know, you’ve got sexual crimes honor killings, female genital mutilation, a bunch of stuff that are unacceptable in the west but they continue in Europe. We have these issues on a much smaller scale in the United States.”

He continues, “The cultural issues are tearing Europe apart. The long-term issue is the lack of assimilation and the United States should learn from Europe. It’s not a question of—we believe so much in freedom of religion that it’s very, very difficult for Americans to say ‘Well, I wish we can discriminate against Islam.’ The way to think about Islam is not as a religion, but as a way of organizing a complete society.”

To view the complete interview, click here.

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